RICHARD TUTTLE

Richard Tuttle

【Introduction】

From the mid-1960s, Tuttle used common items: paper, scrap wood and metal, plastic, wire, etc. to create sculptures. Until that time, these items tended to be overlooked and their ability to play a major role was largely denied, but through the exquisite work by Tuttle, they became liberated objects. At a time when size and the mass of materials were used to overpower spaces, Tuttle focused on creating peculiar, sometimes even improvised works. The fundamental shape of his early freestanding simple forms were his drawings transferred to canvas, wood, and wire to become three-dimensional objects.
His works also include 8 cm strands of rope affixed to walls by pins. In Japan at the same time (early 1970s), the “Mono-ha” movement used similar materials and techniques to actively explore and present materials as they were.
Tuttle has diversified his materials over time and the forms have also become more complicated, but when we, the viewers, look at his works, we can see that the basic materials or natural items, with power that exceeds the boundaries of our world, continue to be used.

【Concept】

In pieces were both stoicism and abundance coexist, there is always an acute sense of adventure. As arts tackle the issues after the 20th century, Tuttle continues to search his independent style, to question the concepts of composition and frame, explore the balance between line and volume, and merge the mystical with the material. His multi-varied path leads to rows of small objects, each having a different form, or an installation in a corner. With objects hanging in your line of sight, the space will shift from the ordinary to a type of sacred space. In the words of Tuttle himself, art is reality-based, not imitation based.

“There is no way out—but there is always a way out, and that’s what we find in significance. It’s this sort of significance, I would like to show people—so, maybe, the question is, where to find this significance, i.e., in the special (masterpiece) or the everyday?” (Richard Tuttle. “In which to Find Significance”. In Richard Tuttle – Selected Works: 1964-1994. P.12. Sezon Museum. 1995.)

Artist Profile

Richard Tuttle

Richard Tuttle was born in Rahway, New Jersey, USA, in 1941. He currently lives and works in New York City, and New Mexico. In 1963 he completed his BA in philosophy and literature at Trinity College, Hartford, USA. He held his first solo exhibition at Betty Parsons Gallery, New York, in 1965 when he was 24 years old, and an exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1975 when he was 34 years old. Such exhibitions attracted significant attention, and had given rise to various topics of public discussion. Tuttle has further participated in international exhibitions such as La Biennale di Venezia (1976, 1997, 2001), Documenta (1972, 1977, 1987), “Skulptur Projekte in Münster” (1987), and the Whitney Biennial (1977, 1987, 2000). Richard Tuttle is thus not only a leading figure in post minimalism, but can also be described as an artist who has constantly stimulated the art scene while transcending conventions of categorization, historical contexts, and genres.

His recent exhibitions include The Art of Richard Tuttle, a large-scale retrospective that was held at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, and then traveled across various venues within the USA from 2005 to 2007. In 2014, Tuttle held a major exhibition I Don’t Know, Or The Weave of Textile Language at the Tate Modern and Whitechapel Gallery, garnering much interest for his monumental winged sculpture with textiles that was installed in the Turbine Hall. Tuttle’s works are housed in the collections of numerous museums throughout the world including the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Metropolitan Museum among other prestigious museums in the USA, as well as the Tate Modern, Centre Pompidou, and Museum Ludwig. In Japan, his work is a part of the collection of the National Museum of Art, Osaka.

  • Dark Extension 2007 
mixed media (plastic, hot glue, acrylic, Gouache) 
h.20.8 × w.10.3 × d.10.0 cm 
©Richard Tuttle
  • Dark Extension 2007 
mixed media (cardboard, acrylic)
 h.18.5 × w.7.7 × d.8.3 cm ©Richard Tuttle
  • Dark Extension 2007 
mixed media (wire, bottons, thread, card board, hot glue) h.20.3 × w.7.5 × d.9.6 cm
 ©Richard Tuttle
  • Dark Extension 2007
 mixed media (saw dust,pigment, sand paper, hot glue) 
h.18.5 × w.10.7 × d.9.5 cm
 ©Richard Tuttle
  • Dark Extension 2007 
mixed media (balsa wood, aluminum, acrylic, screws, graphite)
 h.18.5 × w.6.5 × d.8.0 cm 
©Richard Tuttle
  • Dark Extension 2007 
mixed media (card board, wire, pigment, paper mache, hot glue)
 h.30.5 × w.17.0 × d.9.0 cm 
©Richard Tuttle